Clancy Aussie Doodles

We are a Family Breeder of Multi-Generation Authentic Australian Labradoodles

Australian Labradoodle Colors

Here I am giving you the different Labradoodle Colors that Breeders have developed. There are 5 main colors in the Australian Labradoodle bloodline: Black, Silver, Chocolate, Cream, and Red.

Black Australian Labradoodle PuppyBlack Labradoodles

With the black labradoodle color, the dog is Jet Black all over.

Silver LabradoodlesSilver Labradoodle

Silver Labradoodles are born Black. Some Silver Labradoodles can be born with silver between their foot pads and an experienced breeder will spot this when the puppies are quite young.

Others may not develop any silver until around 8 or 9 weeks old, in the form of spectacles around their eyes.

The Silvers go through stages of brown, through to grey charcoal, with the silver coming up their legs, spreading to their hocks and tails and eventually their whole body.

The really good Silvers will go through a blueish stage and end up pure platinum.

Chocolate Labradoodles

All browns are born Chocolate. Cafes develop golden coat around their muzzles at between 6 and 12 weeks of age.

Most Chocolates end up Cafe, although some true Chocolates can appear to be Cafe due to sun burning which produces beautiful golden highlights through their coats.

If the coat is parted, the true Chocolate color can still be seen at the roots, whereas the Cafe will pale in color right through to the roots.

Cream LabradoodlesPayton and I

 

Creams vary from pale milky cream right through to rich Apricot Creams who are cream on body but have dark apricot ears.

Some will have reddish tinges through the coat as well. Some pale with age, and others deepen. First signs of deepening occur along the backline of the dog, on the muzzle and on the hocks and top of tail.

Red Australian Labradoodle on a BoatRed Labradoodle

 

Highly prized, Reds are not easy to breed and are still comparatively rare (even in the Poodle). Some breeders will mistake Apricots for Red, but the true Red is the color of an Irish Red Setter.

Extremely beautiful, difficult to breed, and highly sought after. Most Reds will fade to some extent over time, so should be a very rich color when young.

As you can see Labradoodle Colors are available in a very wide selection.

Just go ahead and pick, all are adorable, loving companions that are hypo-allergenic and non-shedding.

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Labradoodles – Ten Facts to Convince You That They Are Not Just Any Old Designer Dog!

Labradoodles are often described as designer dogs but this description can  sometimes diminish the real purpose of their development, as Labradoodles were  originally bred as assistance dogs for people with allergies. Read on to  discover ten more interesting facts about this wonderful dog.

* After two years of attempting to produce a hypo-allergenic dog for a blind  woman in Hawaii, Wally Conran of Guide Dogs Victoria, Australia, finally  produced three ‘allergy friendly’ puppies, and first used the term  Labradoodle.

* Dog training can be great fun, and with the Labradoodle’s high intelligence  and loyal nature, regular short training and play sessions are perfect for  bonding with this dog. Labradoodles sometimes undergo gundog training and can  benefit hugely from the discipline involved in this type of dog training.

* The size of a Labradoodle can vary greatly depending on whether a Standard  Poodle or a Miniature Poodle is used in the cross; but also multi-generational  pups can be smaller than their F1 counterparts, as Labradoodle is bred with  Labradoodle.

* Celebrity owners of Labradoodles include Graham Norton, Jeremy Clarkson,  Jennifer Aniston and Tiger Woods. A Labradoodle also nearly made it into the  White House, but unfortunately was pipped at the post by a Portuguese Water  Hound.

* The Labradoodle coat can come in many colours, including black, chocolate,  cream, apricot and silver. It can vary enormously in texture, and ranges from  being flat like a Labrador, to very curly like a Poodle. Their coats may alter  several times as they grow, and a fully grown adult dog often bears little  resemblance to the puppy it once was.

* Although it has not yet been recognised as a ‘true breed’ by The Kennel  Club, the Labradoodle does have the distinction of being listed in the Oxford  English Dictionary, as well as being featured in an Australian version of  Monopoly. The Labradoodle is a self sustaining breed and is no longer just a combination of a labrador retriever and a poodle.

* It appears that Labradoodles have amazing tracking skills, as a Labradoodle  in America, who is a companion dog to a boy with autism, travelled across two  counties recently, in search of his owner. The dog had been left with relatives  who lived twelve miles away, but he jumped a 6′ fence, negotiated two interstate  highways and avoided numerous coyotes on his way back. He was found about a mile  from his home, and then he slept for three days solid!

* A Labradoodle pup from a reputable breeder can cost around £750, but much  careful research should be done with regard to breeders, to ensure that they  have the dogs’ interests at heart and are not just breeding pups for the money.  There is often a waiting list for pups, and the breeder should take as much  interest in you as possible owners, as you do in the pups. Many breeders will  give out a questionnaire in order to establish the suitability of prospective  owners.

* The UK Labradoodle Association was formed in 1999, and provides a good  source of information and advice to anyone considering buying a Labradoodle. The  forum provides much helpful advice on dog training, and dog health and  nutrition, and the site provides information for both dog breeders and  owners.

* Allergic reactions to dogs may not just originate from their fur, but can  also be caused by the dander and saliva of the dog. Great care, therefore, must  be taken when choosing a Labradoodle pup, and a good tip is to look at the  parents and any adult siblings from previous litters, if possible.

I hope this short introduction to the Labradoodle has convinced you of the  special qualities of this amazing dog

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/2453624

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Labradoodle Pet Owner FAQ’s

Click on the question to be taken directly to the answer.

What is a F1, F1B, Australian Labradoodle, Labradoodle and all those numbers? What is the grading scheme?

What is the difference between a Labradoodle and an Australian Labradoodle?

What is an American Labradoodle?

What is hybrid Vigor and does it apply to labradoodles or Australian Labradoodles?

What are common health issues in Labradoodles and Australian Labradoodles?

What is a F1, F1B, and all those numbers?

  • F1: The “F” stands for “filial generation”. “F1″ means “first generation” and is a common scientific term. This, in the Labradoodle breed, is the coding for First cross, purebred poodle to purebred Labrador Retriever. The results are mixed as this is not the breeding of two “like” dogs, dogs that resemble each other.  F1 are typically moderate to low shedding and have a sparse hair to fleece coat.
  • F1B: The “F” stands for “filial generation”. “F1″ means “first generation” and the addition of the B refers to Backcross. In Science,  it is common to state the long version F1 Backcross. This, in the Labradoodle breed, is the coding for a Labradoodle F1, as defined above, bred (or backcross) to a purebred Poodle. The results are mixed as this is not the breeding of two “like” dogs, dogs that resemble each other. F1b are typically low shedding to non shedding (as much as a dog can be non shedding) if the parents are both non shedding. and have a hair to fleece coat.
  • Australian Labradoodle is a dog that carries the DNA of the Labrador, Poodle and Cocker Spaniel (American or English). The resulting offspring are more similar but slightly mixed depending on the parent dogs. An Australian Labradoodle can be created by the crossing of a Poodle to another Australian Labradoodle, a Cock a poo to a Labradoodle, a Labradoodle to a Cocker Spaniel and the like, resulting in the three breed combination. The Australian Labradoodle is the first step, once an Australian Labradoodle is crossed to another Australian Labradoodle the result is termed a Multigen (Multigenerational) Australian Labradoodle as it involves multiple generations of breeding like to like.  Australian Labradoodles and Multigen Australian Labradoodles typically have a non shedding coat (as much as a dog can be non shedding) if both parents are also non shedding.
  • Multigen Australian Labradoodle (Multigenerational) is the breeding of an Australian Labradoodle to another Australian Labradoodle.  Multigen Australian Labradoodles typically have a non shedding coat  if both parents are also non-shedding.
  • Purebred Australian Labradoodle: The definition of purebred was determined in 1852. Merriam-Webster’s definition of purebred: Date:  1852 : bred from members of a recognized breed, strain, or kind without admixture of other blood over many generations.  Furthermore the AKC in their foundation service requires 4 generations of like to like matings.  Therefore the ALAA uses these two references and once an Australian Labradoodle has been breed to another Australian Labradoodle in 4 CONSECUTIVE matings it will be considered a purebred.

    Grading Scheme
    (voted by membership March 2008)

What is the difference between a Labradoodle and an Australian Labradoodle?

A Labradoodle is the result of breeding the Labrador Retriever to a Poodle, Labradoodle to Poodle, or Labradoodle to Labradoodle.  Basically the Labradoodle has Labrador Retriever and Poodle only DNA nothing else.  The description of the Labradoodle in “Designer Dogs, Portraits and Profiles of Popular New Crossbreeds” by Caroline Colie says it best. “This is one celebrity canine who doesn’t read his own press and with his rave reviews, he doesn’t need to. Easygoing and self-assured, the Labradoodle is a modest mister who’s just happy to hang out with his friends.

He’s a self-made bloke, the Cary Grant of designer dogs.  Born of working –class Labrador Retriever and Standard Poodle parents,” (the smaller sizes have miniature poodle) “his destiny seemed laid our ahead of him as a working dog.  Though he was good at his job, his handsome looks and winning personality propelled him to greater fame, and soon he was on the A-list of every chic club in town.

The Labradoodle doesn’t let celebrity go to his head, however. He’s a gregarious fellow who doesn’t judge people by their position.  Actually, he’s more interested in whether their car has four-wheel drive, so he can get where he wants to go.  He’s a nature lover, with a special interest in waterfowl, thanks to his outdoorsy parents.

This is a casual guy who won’t mind sloshing thorough puddles without rain gear, and in fact prefers it.  He’ll think nothing of showing up with a bandanna around his neck and his hair still wet from a swim.  But he cleans up so well, he can easily switch from a down-home kerchief at the beach to a diamond-studded collar at dinner.  He likes his sports, and is happy hobnobbing at the polo grounds (or just lounging on the sofa watching NASCAR).  But he’s rather participate than watch, and his idea of paradise is a day at the beach chasing a ball, catching a curl, or snoozing in the shade, beach-bum style.

Despite his full social calendar, he always seems able to squeeze in one more play date, especially with his favorite partners-kids.  And you’ll need to make sure he gets plenty of exercise every day.” (A Labradoodle is the reflection of his parents, the first generation, Labrador to Poodle is generally higher energy and drive than second generation.  Either generation of high energy or laid back parents is typically a reflection of those temperaments)  “Labradoodles don’t tire easily, and unless he’s truly tuckered out, he can become creative in ways you don’t really want to find out about.” Page 89

Labradoodles can be Standard, Medium and sometimes Miniature although toy poodle use is not recommended.  All colors of the poodle can be found in the Labradoodle. Coat types include various waves of straight, kinky to a spiraling curl.  The coat texture ranges as well from a harsh wool, softer fleece (not as silky as the fleece of the Australian Labradoodle), or hair coats (slightly longer but more like the Labrador coat).  The non-shedding or low shedding fleece and wool should be brushed weekly due to matting and groomed bi monthly, while the hair coat, which does shed, requires less grooming.

An Australian Labradoodle is the result of breeding a Labradoodle (Labrador Poodle only cross) originally but adding in Cocker Spaniel (American or English).  This maintained the larger boning but brought the incredible soft fleece coat.  The term “Australian” was added as a prefix to honor the place of origin as Wally Conron working with the Royal Guide Dog Association of Australia as its puppy-breeding manager in the early ’80s breed the first Labradoodle (first generation F1) and second generation ( F1B what he termed a double doodle) developed an allergy friend guide dog.

Again we will quote “Designer Dogs, Portraits and Profiles of Popular New Crossbreeds” by Caroline Colie as it is a wonderful description of the breed.  Thank you Dr. Colie.

One of the first breeds on the designer-dog scene, this fella has rocked his way to international stardom.  Whether you’re up for some Aussie rules football, or just snuggling and having a cuppa, this bloke’s always game.

The land Down Under used to be best known for kangaroos and boomerangs, but that was before the Australian Labradoodle wagged his tail onto the scene.  This pooch isn’t your average designer dog.  In fact, he’s technically not a standard hybrid.  He started off as a simple cross of a Labrador Retriever and a Poodle, but then the recipe got complicated.  A dash of Irish Water Spaniel, a dollop of Curly Coated Retriever” (these two are no longer used and not in all pedigrees) “, and a sprinkling of English and American Cocker Spaniels went into the mix.  Now the breed has worldwide clubs, such as the International Labradoodle Association” (Now the IALA) “working to promote the Australian Labradoodle as a legitimate breed in development.

Greeting everyone with tail-wag semaphore for “G’day, mate,” Aussie Labradoodles are friends to all, more likely to invite a burglar in to fire up the Barbie than they are to scare him away.  If you have a game to play or a walkabout to take, he’s an instant chum.  He may even dazzle you with his “kanadoodle,” a vertical jump that launches him up among the stars—where he belongs, of course.

Once back on the ground, he’s equally athletic and energetic, and loves to run, swim and fetch.  Great in the outdoors, this ‘Doodle is less suited to the city (unless you can devote your entire life to running and throwing balls).” (Please note Australian Labradoodles are a reflection of their parents and some are total couch potatoes while others marathon runners)  “But he’s more than a star jock. He’s smart and actually likes having a job to do.  He’s a gifted retriever, an enthusiastic obedience dog, and a successful service dog.  In fact, he was first developed as a guide dog for the blind.

Australian Labradoodles can be Standard, Medium or Miniature.  All colors of the poodle can be found in the Australian Labradoodle. Coat types include various waves of straight to a spiraling curl.  The coat texture ranges from wool, soft wool to a silky fleece and many are a combination of the three.  The non-shedding or very low shedding fleece and wool should be brushed weekly due to matting and groomed bi monthly.  Finding an experienced groomer is difficult; the best option is to print out photos to take to the groomer to get the results you want.

What is an American Labradoodle?

The term American Labradoodle is not recognized by the ALAA, in fact the Labradoodle or Lab/Poodle cross was originated in Australia not America.  Some novice breeders use this term to define the lab/poodle only cross incorrectly.

What is hybrid Vigor and does it apply to labradoodles or Australian Labradoodles?

Hybrid vigor is incorrectly applied to all Labradoodles and Australian Labradoodles.  Hybrid Vigor is a term used when a breeder is trying to establish that breeding two different purebred dogs results in healthier offspring.  Genetically this applies ONLY to health issues NOT inherent in both breeds and in the initial cross.  Due to the fact that most common health issues of the Labrador Retriever, Poodle or even Cocker Spaniel are common to ALL these breeds, hybrid vigor does not apply.  See the Health Testing link on this page for health issues common to these dogs. However, the possible effects of out crossing (breeding unrelated pedigrees together) may result in healthier dogs, this would apply as purebred Labrador Retrievers, Poodles and Cocker Spaniels do not have common ancestors.

What are common health issues in Labradoodles and Australian Labradoodles?

The Labradoodle and Australian Labradoodle is generally considered a healthy breed, however possible issues breeders should be screening breeding parents for include PRA prcd, Hip Dysplasia, Patella Luxation, General Eye problems.  Non health related, but common, include bite issues such as the juvenile underbite. Please see the Health Testing link for a detailed description on all possible health issues and what the ALAA is doing about these issues.

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Labradoodle General Health & Care

The information below is provided to assist you in the care of your labradoodle puppy or dog. Here is a printer friendly version of this information. PUPPY CARE

Trimming Your Dog’s Claws

It can be a daunting task, but is absolutely necessary. You must trim your dog’s claws on a regular basis, usually once or twice a month. Don’t forget the dew claws on the inner side of the front paws! They are easily forgotten but must be trimmed like every other nail. If you do not trim them, it is much more likely for them to snag on something and be torn. A torn dewclaw is a very painful thing for your dog to experience and can many times result in a trip to the vet.

Each dog will need to be trimmed at different intervals depending on their lifestyle and activity level. A lot of people are very nervous about trimming claws. If you are not comfortable, have a groomer or vet show you how. To assist you in proper nail trimming, below are some links with information and pictures.

Cleaning Ears & Plucking Ear Hair

Ear cleaning is not the most fun job in the world, but it should be part of your normal grooming routine. Your dog’s ear health depends on you. Infections come on quickly, and keeping your dog’s ears dry and clean is necessary. If you notice your dog scratching at his ears, or redness in the ear, or an unpleaseant odor, your dog may be developing an ear infection. Cleaning alone will not clear up an infection. Visit your vet if you notice any of these symptoms. For general ear cleaning, here are a few links to helpful   techniques.

Bacteria thrive in moist places like the ear canal. Removing excess hair may be necessary to allow proper air flow. Keep the hair trimmed short just underneath the ear flap, and if the ear canal itself has an abundance of hair, clipping it short or plucking some of the hair out may be helpful. Refrain from excessive plucking as too much irritation to the skin can allow for entry points for bacteria as well. Your vet or groomer can show you how to pluck ear hair efficiently.

Eye Care

There are things you can do to prevent eye infections in your dog. Regular cleaning and care is simple.

  • Keep the hair trimmed away from your dog’s eyes using blunt tipped scissors. Hair that rubs against your dog’s eyes can place bacteria into the eye which can lead to infection.
  • Keep eyes clean by using an eye wash or pads designed to wipe away debris and gunk from the eye.
  • Check eyes regularly and if anything looks abnormal, call your vet for an appointment.

Teeth Cleaning & Care

Good dental care is mandatory for your dog. Preventing oral disease is simple with regular dental care. Regular brushing of your dog’s teeth is very important. For more information about veterinary and home care for your dog, please read the following information.

Exercising Your Dog

Dogs need  exercise for their physical health and mental well being. Every dog will have different energy outlet needs. In general, you can expect your dog to require an hour every day of physical activity. Some good options are running and playing in a good game of fetch, or a long walk, jogging or biking along with you. Not only is this good for your dog’s health, it is good for the dog-human bond as well. If your dog has any pre-existing health issues, discuss with your vet what they recommend for your exercise plan with your dog. It’s also important to talk with your vet about the appropriate exercise for the age of your dog and for joint development. Some exercises can actually harm the developing joints. Here are some things to remember when exercising your dog.

  • If your dog is still growing, do not take him for long jogs, and definitely do not take him running with you. Developing joints may be harmed by repetitive motion on hard surfaces.
  • Avoid exercising in extreme heat, and if you would take water along for you, remember your dog would will need water too.
  • If your dog seems tired, discontinue what you are doing and allow him to rest.

Dog Diet & Health

The diet you choose to feed your dog is a very important decision. Canine health is dependent on the appropriate balance of nutrients and calories sufficient for prime growth, activity level, and cellular repair. Diest not only plays a major role in short term health, but long term health issues. Choosing a food or diet can be a difficult decision. There are many viewpoints regarding feeding a dry kibble diet, raw food diets, or combining a bit of the two.

Whatever diet you decide on, it is important that it is a complete and balanced diet. We  suggest  choosing a food with high quality animal proteins, no by-products, no unidentified fat or protein sources, only whole grains and vegetables, no artificial colors, flavors or preservatives, no added sweeteners, and products with organic ingredients. When considering dog foods, don’t forget those treat you buy your four legged friend! It is just as important to find healthy treats to give to your dog that are not filled with preservatives, fillers or by-products.

For your consideration, we have provided links to information regarding dog diet and health.

Fleas & Ticks

Fleas and ticks are a nuisance, but only a small issue if taken care of right  away. If you let them get to an infestation level, they can kill your dog.  Fleas and ticks also spread disease, cause allergic reactions, and help spread  blood and intestinal parasites. There are many ways to treat for fleas and  ticks, and most chemical products are safe if used properly. There are  individual products to treat each issue, or products that prevent and kill both  fleas and ticks, and one product that treats for both as well as heartworm.

Here are a few of the most well known and studied  products.

  • Advantage treats fleas only. Monthly topical.
  • Frontline       Plus treats fleas and ticks. Monthly topical.
  • Revolution treats fleas and ticks and heartworm. Monthly topical.
  • Sentinel treats fleas only. Monthly oral.

For those who prefer holistic care, frequent bathing and  manual removal of fleas and ticks can help prevent infestation of your home and  yard. Use a flea comb and tick remover after each bath.

Heartworm

Heartworm can be deadly if not caught in the early stages of development.  Prevention is critical. Heartworm lives in a dog’s bloodstream and attacks the  heart muscle. According to the Heartworm Society, this parasite lives on every  continent except Antarctica.

The most common treatment of heartworm involves giving your dog a medication  every 4-6 weeks. The medications come in chewable tablets or topical  application.

  • Chewables made by Heartgard, Interceptor, and Proheart
  • Topical applications made by Revolution and Advantage.

Currently, only Revolution treats for all three issues:  fleas, ticks and heartworm.

One of the best ways to aid in flea, tick and heartworm prevention is to  discourage flea, tick and mosquito population in your yard. Keep lawns trimmed  short, eliminate standing water, and introduce plants that repel these pests.

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My Story: I Designed a Dog, by Wally Conron

Printed 7/10/2007 by http://www.readersdigest.com.au/

Determined to source the most suitable guide-dog for a client, I unwittingly turned the canine world upside down

While working with the Royal Guide Dog Association of Australia as its puppy-breeding manager in the early ’80s, I received a request from Hawaii. A vision-impaired woman there, whose husband was allergic to dog hair, had written to our centre in the hope that we might have an allergy-free guide-dog.

“Piece of cake,” I thought. The standard poodle, a trainable working dog, was probably the most suitable breed, with its tightly curled coat. Although our centre bred and used labradors, I didn’t anticipate any difficulties finding a suitable poodle.

It turned out I was wrong: after rejecting countless poodles with various problems, some two years and 33 disappointing trials later, I still hadn’t found an appropriate dog for the job.

In desperation, I decided to cross a standard poodle with one of our best-producing labradors.

The mating was successful, but it produced only three pups. We sent coat and saliva samples of each pup to the Hawaiian couple, and the husband found one sample allergy-free. At last we were getting somewhere, but a big job lay ahead. The pup had to grow up and prove suitable for guiding work; and then it had to be compatible with the visually impaired client. We had a long way to go.

With a three to six-month waiting list for people wishing to foster our pups, I was sure we’d have no problem placing our three new crossbred pups with a family. But again I was wrong: it seemed no-one wanted a crossbred puppy; everyone on the waiting list preferred to wait for a purebred. And time was running out – the pups needed to be placed in homes and socialised; otherwise they would not become guide-dogs.

By eight weeks of age, the puppies still hadn’t found homes. Frustrated and annoyed with the response to the trio of crossbreeds I had carefully reared, I decided to stop mentioning the word crossbreed and introduced the term labradoodle instead to describe my new allergy-free guide-dog pups.

It worked – during the weeks that followed, our switchboard was inundated with calls from other guide-dog centres, vision-impaired people and people allergic to dog hair who wanted to know more about this “wonder dog”. My three pups may have been mongrels at heart – but the furore did not abate.

It was 1989 and the publicity surrounding the new designer dogs went national and then international. A new world opened for countless people who had once thought they could never enjoy the delight of a pet pooch.

With this kind of response, I knew we were on to a winner, and I took the decision to breed more of the labrador-poodle crosses. So I contacted the then Kennel Control Councilof Australia, hoping to find the names of reputable breeders who were breeding standard problem-free poodles.

“If you use any registered dog for your programme, that breeder will be struck off the register and never be allowed to show or register their dogs again,” the council’s spokesperson warned. Nor did he budge when I explained that the dogs were being bred to help vision-impaired people.

The breeders themselves were split: many did subsequentely threaten me or propose litigation if I used their progeny in my breeding programme, while others offered their services free to the guide-dog centre.

While all this was happening, I continued training Sultan, the original non-allergenic pup. He eventually went to Hawaii, amid intense media coverage, where as the world’s first labradoodle he bonded beautifully with his new owner and her allergic husband.

Interest in the labradoodle continued to escalate and inquiries poured in from all over the world from people wishing to either purchase or breed the dogs. But

I quickly realised that I’d opened a Pandora’s box when our next litter of ten labradoodles produced only three allergy-free pups.

I began to worry, too, about backyard breeders producing supposedly “allergy-free” dogs for profit. Already, one man claimed to be the first to breed a poodle- Rottweiler cross!

Nothing, however, could stop the mania that followed. New breeds began to flood the market: groodles, spoodles, caboodles and snoodles. Were breeders bothering to check their sires and bitches for heredity faults, or were they simply caught up in delivering to hungry customers the next status symbol? We’ll never know for sure.

Today I am internationally credited as the first person to breed the labradoodle, but I wonder, in my retirement, whether we bred a designer dog – or a disaster!

Retiree Wally Conron, 78, still keeps two labradors, Rocky and Jazz, but his first love is for horses. He has nine of his own that he breeds and trains when he’s not giving riding lessons to horse-lovers in rural Victoria.

Fascinating History – Exciting Future!

To continue the efforts of Wally Conron,  breeders in Australia began breeding Labradoodles determined to produce litters with consistent conformation, coat type, and temperament. During the 90′s, a number of other dog breeds were  bred into the Labradoodle lines to assist in this effort. Most often the English Cocker Spaniel and American Cocker Spaniel were the breeds used, however, it is reported that  a few other dog breeds were also introduced into certain lines. DNA evidence of these dog breeds are still found in a few lines today, while others were  bred out and not re-introduced into any other blood lines.

Currently the Australian Labradoodle is considered to be a cross between the Poodle, Cocker Spaniel and Labrador Retriever, while the Labradoodle is a cross between the Labrador Retriever and Poodle only and is primarily first or second generation.

Organizations have been formed to protect the continued development of the Australian Labradoodle lines, and guidelines for the continued introduction of English and American Cocker Spaniel are followed carefully. Infusion committees also discuss the merits of other possible dog breeds being allowed careful introduction into select lines. It is an exciting time to be involved in the development of this breed.

For more information about our organizations development, and other organizations in existence that are caretakers of the Australian Labradoodle, please visit our ALAA History page.

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Labradoodle Breed Standard

Grading Scheme (voted in by membership March 2008)

The Labradoodle, offspring of a poodle and Labrador mating, or  the offspring of a Labradoodle (F1) bred to a Labradoodle (F1, F1b, Multi-gen) provides the foundation stone for building the Australian Labradoodle Breed.  Labradoodles promote the vigor and longevity of the breed.  The IALA is currently writing Labradoodle Standards and Guidelines to help pet buyers select their puppies, and breeders select quality foundation stock to expand and strengthen their kennels. What Type of Labradoodle do I have? Typically, breeders and owners will refer to their Labradoodles as Hair Coated, Fleece Coated or Wool Coated Labradoodles. These pertain to physical coat properties described in the Labradoodle Breed Standard.

In addition, a breeder or owner may use a pedigree to describe the dog with the following grading scheme descriptors: First Generation Labradoodle (Labrador Retriever bred to Poodle), Second Generation Labradoodle (First Generation bred to Poodle) or Third Generation Labradoodle (Second Generation to Second Generation) and so on.

Temperament and Soundness are the two KEY elements in a good family companion; they must not be sacrificed for any reason.

Although the Hair Coated Labradoodle, Fleece Coated Labradoodle or Wool Coated Labradoodle breed Standard is under revision at this time, the following attributes are consistent with the Australian Labradoodle Breed Standard

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Currently there are three sizes of Australian Labradoodles during this stage of continued development, it is acceptable and expected to see inter size breeding at this time.

Sizes: Height: 14 to 24 (not over 25) inches (35cm to 63cm) at wither. Weight: 7kg to 30kg (15-65lbs).

Miniature range: Height: 14 to16 (not over 17) inches (35cm to 42cm) at wither.

Medium range: Height: 17 to 20 (not over 21) inches (43cm to 52cm) at wither. The ideal size for the female is 17 to19 inches and the male is 18 to 20 inches.

Standard range: Height: 21 to 24 (not over 25) inches (53cm to 63cm) at wither.  The ideal size for the female is 21 to 23 inches and the male is 22 to 24 inches.

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Colours: To see pictures of the Labradoodle Colours click here

Colour: Coat patterns in Australian Labradoodle include the following: All solid colours. Colours of Parchment, Lavender, Cafe’ and Chocolate may have dark amber eyes; liver noses, eye rims and lips; and dark nails. Colours of Caramel may have dark amber to pale hazel-green eyes; liver noses, eye rims and lips; and self coloured to dark nails. Colours of Gold, Red, Black, Blue and Silver must have very dark eyes; black noses, eye rims and lips; and black or self-coloured nails. Colours of Chalk and Cream may have either pigmentation of dark amber to pale hazel-green eyes; liver noses, eye rims and lips; and self coloured to dark nails or very dark eyes; black noses, eye rims and lips; and black or self-coloured nails. These colours may appear in one of the following patterns:

  • Solid. Colour is solid and preferably even, preferably with no white markings.   A small white flash no larger than 2.5cm in diameter can appear on the chest, feet or tail and is permissible. Even colours are preferred but natural colouration of the coat is not considered a fault.
  • Parti: Colour is fifty percent white, with spots/patches of any other solid colour. No set pattern is required but symmetrical markings on the head are preferred. Freckling of the solid colour in the white of the coat is acceptable but not encouraged.
  • Phantom: The body colour must be a solid colour with defined markings of a second colour as follows: above each eye, on the sides of the muzzle, on the cheek, on the underside of the ears, on the throat to forchest, or in a chin and forechest pattern, with a minimum second colouring on the feet preferably up the legs, and below the tail. Second colour in the inside of the leg and flank is also acceptable and should not be penalized. Markings are preferred to be clear and defined.  Face markings of the second colour with the entire face coloured is acceptable, though not preferred, if the other required body markings are present. Any of the solid colours combination is acceptable.
  • Abstract: Any solid colour with the second colour being white, must have less than fifty percent white.
  • Sable: Black-tipped hairs on any solid colour, preferable even but no penalty for uneven pattern of ticking.
  • Brindle: Should have an even and equal distribution of the colours with layering of black hairs in regions of lighter colours (usually, chalk/cream/gold/red, cafe/lavender/parchment, or silver) producing a tiger-striped pattern.
  • Multi:Multiple colours or patterns, as in a phantom with large white Abstract markings, or a Parti pattern with Sable ticking etc…NOTE: It is normal that all colours may show bleaching and discolouration over the top coat, referred to as sunning, this is quite expected and acceptable. The Australian Labradoodle is an active dog and often a service dog that enjoys the outdoors. Sunning or weather bleaching MUST NOT be penalized.
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Australian Labradoodle Breed Standard

Grading Scheme (voted in by membership March 2008)

Labradoodle Breed Standard ( revised 2007 )

Typically, breeders and owners will refer to their Australian Labradoodles as Fleece Coated Australian Labradoodles or Wool Coated Australian Labradoodles.  These pertain to coat descriptions found in the Australian Labradoodle Breed Standard.


General Appearance: Must appear athletic and graceful with a compact body displaying substance with medium boning. Should not appear cloddy or heavy nor overly fine. A distinctive feature of this breed is their coat, which is non-shedding and easy to manage.

Temperament: Extremely clever, sociable, comical, joyful, energetic when free and soft and quiet when handled. They should approach people in a happy friendly manner, keen and easy to train.   They should display an intuition about their family members or handler’s current emotional state or needs.   This ability to “know” is what has made the Australian Labradoodle an excellent dog for individuals with special needs.

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Currently there are three sizes of Australian Labradoodles during this stage of continued development, it is acceptable and expected to see inter size breeding at this time.

Sizes: Height: 14 to 24 (not over 25) inches (35cm to 63cm) at wither. Weight: 7kg to 30kg (15-65lbs).

Miniature range: Height: 14 to16 (not over 17) inches (35cm to 42cm) at wither.

Medium range: Height: 17 to 20 (not over 21) inches (43cm to 52cm) at wither. The ideal size for the female is 17 to19 inches and the male is 18 to 20 inches.

Standard range: Height: 21 to 24 (not over 25) inches (53cm to 63cm) at wither.  The ideal size for the female is 21 to 23 inches and the male is 22 to 24 inches.

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Head: Moderately broad with well-defined eyebrows. Stop should be moderate with eyes set well apart. The head should be of moderate width; developed but without exaggeration. Foreface to appear shorter than skull. The head should be clean-cut and free from fleshy cheeks. The whole head must be in proportion to the size of the dog.

Eyes: Large, expressive and slightly rounded.

Ears: Set slightly above eye level and should lay flat against head in proportion with the skull. Leather should be of medium thickness, and leather should not hang below the lower lip line. Excessive hair in the ear canal is undesirable.

Mouth: Must be a scissor bite. Upper teeth to just overlap the bottom teeth.

Nose: Should be large, of square appearance and fleshy.

Neck: Well proportioned of good strength, moderately long lending an air of elegance, slightly arched and flow into shoulders with no appearance of abruptness.

Forequarters: Shoulders blades and upperarms to be the same length, and shoulders should be well laid back.  Elbows are set close to the body.  Forelegs to be straight when viewed from the front. Toeing in our out is a fault.

Body: Height (to wither) as to length (from sternum to point of buttock) should appear square and compact. Deep chest and well sprung.  There should be a good tuck up.  Loins should be strong and muscular.

Hindquarters: In profile the croup is nearly flat, slight sloping of the croup is acceptable. Stifles should be moderately turned to propel forward movement, and hindquarters well muscled for power in movement. Hock to heel should be strong and short being perpendicular to the ground. View from the rear should be parallel to each other, must not be cow-hocked.

Feet: The feet are of medium size, round with well-arched toes having elastic and thick pads.  The feet should not turn in or out.

Tail: The tail should follow the topline in repose or when in motion. It may be carried gaily, but should not curl completely over the back.  Tip of tail should not touch the back nor curl upon itself.

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Movement: Trotting gait is effortless, smooth, powerful and coordinated in mature dogs. Should have a good reach in front and drive from behind for forward motion. Sound free movement and a light gait are essential.

Coat: A distinctive feature of this breed is that the coat is non-shedding and easily maintained. Any coat length is acceptable but preferable not past 4 inches in length.  The coat should be even over the entire body.  It should be straight, wavy or forming spirals.   It should not be too thick or dense, nor should it be fluffy or fuzzy.   It should be a single coat.   Any sign of an undercoat is a serious fault. Can range between a fleece to wool in texture.   Extremely harsh hair is highly undesirable.

The Fleece textured coat is a soft texture as in the Angora goat.   It can either have a straight wavy look or a soft spiralling curl look. It is an easy to manage textured coat.

The Wool textured coat is like a lamb’s wool in texture.   It should have the appearance of looser spiralling wool, which opens up easily to the skin. It should not appear thick and dense or tightly curled.

The coat should not appear overly groomed and any appearance of sun bleaching is acceptable.

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Colour: Coat patterns in Australian Labradoodle include the following: All solid colours. Colours of Parchment, Lavender, Cafe’ and Chocolate may have dark amber eyes; liver noses, eye rims and lips; and dark nails. Colours of Caramel may have dark amber to pale hazel-green eyes; liver noses, eye rims and lips; and self coloured to dark nails. Colours of Gold, Red, Black, Blue and Silver must have very dark eyes; black noses, eye rims and lips; and black or self-coloured nails. Colours of Chalk and Cream may have either pigmentation of dark amber to pale hazel-green eyes; liver noses, eye rims and lips; and self coloured to dark nails or very dark eyes; black noses, eye rims and lips; and black or self-coloured nails. These colours may appear in one of the following patterns:

  • Solid. Colour is solid and preferably even, preferably with no white markings.   A small white flash no larger than 2.5cm in diameter can appear on the chest, feet or tail and is permissible. Even colours are preferred but natural colouration of the coat is not considered a fault.
  • Parti: Colour is fifty percent white, with spots/patches of any other solid colour. No set pattern is required but symmetrical markings on the head are preferred. Freckling of the solid colour in the white of the coat is acceptable but not encouraged.
  • Phantom: The body colour must be a solid colour with defined markings of a second colour as follows: above each eye, on the sides of the muzzle, on the cheek, on the underside of the ears, on the throat to forchest, or in a chin and forechest pattern, with a minimum second colouring on the feet preferably up the legs, and below the tail. Second colour in the inside of the leg and flank is also acceptable and should not be penalized. Markings are preferred to be clear and defined.  Face markings of the second colour with the entire face coloured is acceptable, though not preferred, if the other required body markings are present. Any of the solid colours combination is acceptable.
  • Abstract: Any solid colour with the second colour being white, must have less than fifty percent white.
  • Sable: Black-tipped hairs on any solid colour, preferable even but no penalty for uneven pattern of ticking.
  • Brindle: Should have an even and equal distribution of the colours with layering of black hairs in regions of lighter colours (usually, chalk/cream/gold/red, cafe/lavender/parchment, or silver) producing a tiger-striped pattern.
  • Multi:Multiple colours or patterns, as in a phantom with large white Abstract markings, or a Parti pattern with Sable ticking etc…NOTE: It is normal that all colours may show bleaching and discolouration over the top coat, referred to as sunning, this is quite expected and acceptable. The Australian Labradoodle is an active dog and often a service dog that enjoys the outdoors. Sunning or weather bleaching MUST NOT be penalized.

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Your New Labradoodle

Getting Prepared:

When your labradoodle puppy arrives it will be a very special time, but before make sure you have all the needed items for your new puppy!!

Here is a list of items to get:

Dog Crate and/or Puppy Bed
Solid Kennel or Wire Crate-Either is great! (Your puppy-if shipped-will be shipped to you in a solid kennel that certifies with airport regulations)

Grooming Supplies:
Dog Brush (Soft Bristle with Rounded Pin Bristles Works the Best, or Just a Pin Brush)
Steel Comb
Mars Coat King
Baby Wipes (for Cleaning Ears and Teeth)
Dog Nail Clippers
Styptic (Stops the Bleeding if You Accidentally Cut Too Far)
Shampoo

Food:
Blue Buffalo Puppy-Dry Kibble
Food Bowls and Water Dishes-I Prefer Ones That I Can Put in the Dishwasher

Toys:
Kong Chew Toy
Balls, Squeaky Toys
(Do Not Buy Toys With Fluff Inside or Toys That Will Be Torn Apart Easily)

Collar & Leash:
Puppies Come With A Plain Collar
Name Tags
A Leash

Cleaning Supplies:
Paper Towels
Vinegar Or Diluted Bleach Water-For Helping Eliminate the Smell on Floors
Nature’s Miracle-for Carpets

What to Bring to the Airport:

Leash & ID tag for your puppy, bottled water & a small bowl, extra blankets or towels to re-line the crate or for while you are holding it, plastic bag for soiled towels, and a camera ;) . It is best to wait until you get home to feed your puppy, but if you have a long car ride home you can offer a small amount of Ribble. Just remember that the puppy may get carsick or have to poop.

Bedding:

For puppy beds, there are many very adorable beds out there! If you get a wicker bed the puppy will most likely chew it to bits. I prefer beds that have removable covers that are washable, or ones that will not be easily destroyed. You may also have your puppy sleep in its crate or in the bed. Just remember that until the puppy is house trained, it will go to the bathroom whenever it has to wherever it has to. I find most of these products at my local farm or pet supply store. Also there are a lot of great websites to purchase products such as www.revivalanimal.com, www.jbpet.com, and www.petedge.com.

Chew Toys:

Puppies teeth and chew! I know big shocker. However you must be prepared with chew toys, and “Puppy Proof” your house. The Kong is a great chew toy and the puppies love it. Also chew toys that do not have little pieces or are destroyed easily will work. DO NOT FEED RAWHIDE PRODUCTS!!! When eaten by dogs the pieces swell up in their stomach and can cause blockage, bloat, or death if not treated quickly. There are also some new reports out  that say Greenies can cause these problems as well. My vet no longer recommends or sells them. Pig Ears also have issues, these can soften and be eaten whole. They also can have e-coli on them and be a hazard to people especially young children, so wash your hands if you handle them!

Collars & Leashes:

Your puppy will come with a collar. This collar is web snap that will grow with the puppy. It will last a while if you want to wait and pick a style or color after you get the puppy. There are many fun and different collars and leashes out there. Make sure it is one that will work for both you and your new puppy. Leashes are a fun and easy way to train your puppy, but a leash is not really needed until the puppy gets older or if they are prone to running away. Also starting the puppy early with leash training will get it use to staying next to you on walks.

Grooming:

An Australian Labradoodle only needs to be bathed if the are dirty. If you live in a muddy area vigilance is key. If only their paws are dirty then only wash their paws. Baths take the oil out of their fur and make it brittle and prone to breakage, plus it may dry out your dog’s skin. A good brushing every week will ensure that your doodle’s coat stays nice and mat free. The Multi-Stripping-Curry-Comb named Coat-King,  is indispensable for every groomer. They are great for getting out mats (a mat cutter works well also), and is perfect for stripping the puppy coat around 9 to 12 months of age, which should be done weekly. Being groomed, nails clipped, ears and teeth cleaned is essential for your puppy. As the adult coat comes in you labradoodle will definitely need to be groomed and all this “Grooming Specialization” will pay off. After brushing, mist a little bit of water or conditioning spray and pat down the undercoat. This will help restore the waves/curls and prevent knots. If all this seems like too much trouble find a groomer in your area and take your labradoodle there. be aware however that the groomers will tend to cut your labradoodle like a poodle or just give them the standard puppy cut. A puppy cut is a no fuss no muss cut that will keep your puppy tidy.

Training & Treats:

Zuke’s Mini Naturals are ideal for training or anytime as a delicious reward. The healthy benefits of rice, malted barley, and essential vitamins & mineral will keep your dog begging for more. Mini’s are tender, meaty, free of preservatives and contain no wheat, corn, added animal fat, artificial flavors or colors. Small finger-nail sized pieces are perfect for training. Our dogs also love Avoderm Cookies. I usually break them in half. Now and Go treats are also very healthy for your puppy.

There are many great training books out there. Also, your local public library can hold many great books. Try checking out one that suits you, your family, and your new dog best. There are also quite a few good internet sites. A few good books are: The Art of Raising a Puppy, Good Owners Great Dogs, and Cesar’s Way.

Your Puppy’s Food:

Your puppy is currently on Blue Buffalo Puppy, I will be sending a food sample home with your puppy. If you would like to change brands at any time make sure that you leave enough of the original food to mix with the new food. Doing this will prevent sensitive stomaches. Hint. Hint. Costco’s Kirkland Brand of food is a good food also. Please discuss your food choice with your Vet, they may have some good recommendations also. However the Hill Science Diet Dog Food is one of the worst dog food brands out there to buy. So do your research and read the labels in order for a happy healthy puppy.

House Training:

House training may seem like a daunting task to a lot of you. I assure you that with the intelligence of this breed it is quite simple. For house training I highly recommend you get a crate for your puppy!
If you do not want a crate then I recommend you set up an x-pen or another “puppy proof” place that you can put your puppy in. Letting your puppy run the house is only going to lead to accidents, frustrations, and a prolonging of the housebreaking process. The Life Stages Series Front Door Folding Crates are designed for use over the lifetime of your labradoodle!!! This crate is a wire crate that will expand as the puppy grows. Remember you only want enough room for the puppy to turn around and lay down comfortably in the housebreaking stage. You can find this at www.jbpet.com

Well that should be everything you need to knnow about your new puppy but feel free to e-mail (clancyaussiedoodles@hotmail.com) me or post with more questions.

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An Overview of the Labradoodle

History

The first known use of the term “Labradoodle” was by Sir Donald Campbell to describe his Labrador/Poodle cross dog in his 1955 book, “Into the Water Barrier”. However, the Labradoodle became better known in 1988, when Australian breeder Wally Conron crossed the Labrador Retriever and Standard Poodle at Guide Dogs Victoria.

Conron’s aim was to combine the low-shedding coat of the Poodle with the gentleness and trainability of the Labrador, and to provide a guide dog suitable for people with allergies to fur and dander. He’d received a request from a vision impaired woman in Hawaii for a guide dog that did not aggravate her husband’s allergy to dog hair. Originally he planned to train a Standard Poodle, but hair and saliva samples of thirty-three different poodles sent to the woman’s husband all caused an allergic reaction. A Labradoodle litter was bred, and the husband did not have an allergic reaction to one of the puppies from the litter. This puppy, Sultan, was successfully trained by Guide Dogs Victoria, and became the first Labradoodle Guide dog.

Although Guide Dogs Victoria no longer breed Labradoodles, they are bred by other guide and assistance dog organizations in Australia and elsewhere. The Association for the Blind of Western Australia have introduced Labradoodles into their training program, and their first, Jonnie, graduated in November 2010. Labradoodles are now widely used around the world as guide, assistance, and therapy dogs as well as being popular family dog.

Appearance and temperament

A black first-generation F1 Labradoodle puppy only a few days of age.

Labradoodles’ hair can be anywhere from wiry to soft, and may be straight, wavy, or curly.

Like most Labrador Retrievers and Poodles, Labradoodles are generally friendly, energetic and good with families and children (although as with any dog the temperament may vary between individuals). Labradoodles often display an affinity for water and strong swimming ability from their parent breeds.

Like their parent breeds, both of which are amongst the world’s most intelligent dog breeds,Labradoodles are very intelligent and quite trainable, often seeking commands and finding pleasure in learning.

Types of Labradoodles

A group of Labradoodle Assistance Dogs.

There is no consensus as to whether breeders should aim to have Labradoodles recognized as a breed. Some breeders prefer to restrict breeding to early generation dogs (i.e. bred from a Poodle and Labrador rather than from two Labradoodles) to maximize genetic diversity, to avoid the inherited health problems that have plagued some dog breeds.

Others are breeding Labradoodle to Labradoodle over successive generations, and trying to establish a new dog breed. These dogs are usually referred to as Multigenerational (Multigen) or Australian Labradoodles.

Australian Labradoodles also differ from early generation and Multigenerational Labradoodles in that they may also have other breeds in their ancestry. English and American Cocker Spaniel/Poodle crosses (i.e. Cockapoos), Two Irish Water Spaniels and Soft-Coated Wheaten Terriers were used in some Australian Labradoodle lines. The Curly Coated Retriever were used too, but these lines did not work out and they were discontinued.

Jonnie, the first Labradoodle Guide Dog to graduate in WA.

Labradoodle coats are divided into three categories: wool (with tight curls, and similar in appearance to that of a Poodle, but with a softer texture); fleece (soft and free-flowing, with a kinked or wavy appearance); or hair (which can be curly, straight or wavy, but is more similar in texture to a Labrador’s coat). Labradoodles coat colors include chocolate, cafe, parchment, cream, gold, apricot, red, black, silver, chalk, parti colours, (i.e. generally, any color a Poodle can have). They can be different sizes, depending on the size of poodle used (i.e. toy, miniature or standard).

Health

9 month old male Australian Labradoodle bred as companion dog still with a wool puppy coat.

Labradoodles can suffer from problems common to their parent breeds. Poodles and Labrador Retrievers can suffer from hip dysplasia, and should have specialist radiography to check for this problem before breeding. The parent breeds can also suffer from a number of eye disorders, and an examination by a qualified veterinary eye specialist should be performed. Though with a properly breed Multi-Generation Labradoodle should not show these problems very often.

A significant number of Mutigenerational and Australian Labradoodles have also been found to suffer from Addison’s Disease. The Australian Labradoodle Association of America is currently conducting a study to try and determine how widespread the problem has become.

The Labradoodle in Popular Culture

A 2½ year old apricot Labradoodle with a wool type coat.
  • In 2005 the Oxford English Dictionary first listed the word “Labradoodle”
  • Australian actor Bryan Brown played a Labradoodle in the 2008 movie, “Dean Spanley“.
  • Barack Obama announced in January 2009 that his family had narrowed down their choice for “first dog” to either a Labradoodle or a Portuguese Water Dog (PWD). (They were subsequently given a PWD puppy, who they named “Bo“, by the late Senator Edward Kennedy).
  • In an interview given to The Australian in April 2010, Wally Conron said he regretted breeding labradoodles, as he believes their popularity has negatively affected the demand for pedigree dog breeds, and led to the introduction of other “designer” dog types.
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Labradoodle Fun Facts

Labradoodles are often described as designer dogs but this description can  sometimes diminish the real purpose of their development, as Labradoodles were  originally bred as assistance dogs for people with allergies. Read on to  discover ten more interesting facts about this wonderful dog.

* After two years of attempting to produce a hypoallergenic dog for a blind  woman in Hawaii, Wally Conran of Guide Dogs Victoria, Australia, finally  produced three ‘allergy friendly’ puppies, and first used the term  Labradoodle.

* Dog training can be great fun, and with the Labradoodle’s high intelligence  and loyal nature, regular short training and play sessions are perfect for  bonding with this dog. Labradoodles sometimes undergo gun dog training and can  benefit hugely from the discipline involved in this type of dog training.

* The size of a Labradoodle can vary greatly depending on whether a Standard  Poodle or a Miniature Poodle is used in the cross; but also multi-generational  pups can be smaller than their F1 counterparts, as Labradoodle is bred with  Labradoodle.

* Celebrity owners of Labradoodles include Graham Norton, Jeremy Clarkson,  Jennifer Anniston and Tiger Woods. A Labradoodle also nearly made it into the  White House, but unfortunately was pipped at the post by a Portuguese Water  Hound.

* The Labradoodle coat can come in many colours, including black, chocolate,  cream, apricot and silver. It can vary enormously in texture, and ranges from  being flat like a Labrador, to very curly like a Poodle. Their coats may alter  several times as they grow, and a fully grown adult dog often bears little  resemblance to the puppy it once was.

* Although it has not yet been recognised as a ‘true breed’ by The Kennel  Club, the Labradoodle does have the distinction of being listed in the Oxford  English Dictionary, as well as being featured in an Australian version of  Monopoly.

* It appears that Labradoodles have amazing tracking skills, as a Labradoodle  in America, who is a companion dog to a boy with autism, travelled across two  counties recently, in search of his owner. The dog had been left with relatives  who lived twelve miles away, but he jumped a 6′ fence, negotiated two interstate  highways and avoided numerous coyotes on his way back. He was found about a mile  from his home, and then he slept for three days solid!

* A Labradoodle pup from a reputable breeder can cost around £750, but much  careful research should be done with regard to breeders, to ensure that they  have the dogs’ interests at heart and are not just breeding pups for the money.  There is often a waiting list for pups, and the breeder should take as much  interest in you as possible owners, as you do in the pups. Many breeders will  give out a questionnaire in order to establish the suitability of prospective  owners.

* The UK Labradoodle Association was formed in 1999, and provides a good  source of information and advice to anyone considering buying a Labradoodle. The  forum provides much helpful advice on dog training, and dog health and  nutrition, and the site provides information for both dog breeders and  owners.

* Allergic reactions to dogs may not just originate from their fur, but can  also be caused by the dander and saliva of the dog. Great care, therefore, must  be taken when choosing a Labradoodle pup, and a good tip is to look at the  parents and any adult siblings from previous litters, if possible.

I hope this short introduction to the Labradoodle has convinced you of the  special qualities of this amazing dog.

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