Clancy Aussie Doodles

We are a Family Breeder of Multi-Generation Authentic Australian Labradoodles

Puppy Update-10 Weeks Old!

We were born January 4, 2013 and we will be ready to go to our “forever homes” in mid March. There are 6 boys and 1 girl and we all love snuggling together in a big “puppy pile.” Our names are Gimli, Bentley, O’Reilly, Keegan, Doolan, Angus, and Iona. We’re all TEN WEEKS OLD now!

We are accepting deposits on puppies now! The puppies are ready and waiting for their forever homes!

Shoot us an email at clancyaussiedoodles@hotmail.com or give us a call at (307) 413-5892 if you are interested.

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The Puppies Are 9 Weeks Old!

We were born January 4, 2013 and we will be ready to go to our “forever homes” in mid March. There are 6 boys and 1 girl and we all love snuggling together in a big “puppy pile.” Our names are Gimli, Bentley, O’Reilly, Keegan, Doolan, Angus, and Iona. We’re all EIGHT WEEKS OLD now!

We are accepting deposits on puppies now!
Shoot us an email at clancyaussiedoodles@hotmail.com
Or call us at (307) 413-5892
If you are interested.

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Puppy Update-8 Weeks

Once puppies are born, the week to week development can vary but most newborns stick to the same growing pattern. Unlike human babies, puppies develop quickly within their first two months of life and the changes are so quick that you may miss an important milestone. From the first week to the eighth, you are going see your tiny bundles of joy go from wriggling whimpers to full-blown walking balls of energy.

Here’s our report from the Whelping Box:

We were born January 4, 2013 and we will be ready to go to our “forever homes” in mid March. There are 6 boys and 1 girl and we all love snuggling together in a big “puppy pile.” Our names are Gimli, Bentley, O’Reilly, Keegan, Doolan, Angus, and Iona. We’re all EIGHT WEEKS OLD now. You might think we haven’t been doing much for these first fifty-six days of our lives, but we’ve been quite busy. Just look!

Here it is, Day 56, and just look at what’s happened:

At this age, your puppy‘s focus is the basic needs of eating, drinking, sleeping, eliminating and playing.  Your puppy can remember which behaviors he is allowed and where and when he is fed. He can even begin house-training and start becoming used to being groomed. He is ready to leave his mother and littermates to go home with you, fully capable of taking his place in the family. The following list will help you know what to expect from your puppy has he develops.

  • How Big?– Most 8-week-old puppies are only a fraction of their adult height, length and weight.  Most puppies will gain or grow rapidly between birth and 6 months of age.  How much they grow or gain will depend on their breed, diet, and ultimate adult size.  Growth is generally steady until they attain their adult size.
  • Teething- Puppies at 8 weeks will have all 28 of their baby teeth and may develop their first adult front teeth, called the incisors, between 8 and 12 weeks of age.
  • Senses– 8-week-old puppies will show fear, whimper when hurt and bark when excited or wanting attention. You need to build trust with your puppy. Don’t ignore crying but address the cause for the crying with attention and care. Touch is the first sense a dog develops and remains a powerfully important sense throughout his life.  The entire body, including the paws, is covered with touch-sensitive nerve endings.  Although they can see and hear, their sense of vision and hearing is quietly maturing.  They are also developing their general sense of smell.
  • Ability to Hold Urine– 8 week old puppies can generally hold their urine for about 3 hours.  This means you will need to take them out at least every 3 hours to get them “housebroken”.
  • Intelligence– 8 week old puppies are becoming increasingly curious and interested in the environment.   Although capable of learning, they have a very short attention span.  Keep a variety of simple toys for your puppy to investigate. He will also play rough and tumble with his littermates and will gradually begin learning to play by himself.  It is extremely important that puppies socialize with people at this age.  Include lots of people of varying ages, sizes and shapes to interact positively with your pup. Some puppies have a brief phase of “fear” at this time as they may respond to noises or new objects.  Expose your puppy to new objects and allow them to investigate on their own terms until they are comfortable with the new situation.
  • Play & Agility– Most puppies 8 weeks old are “clumsy”.  After all, most puppies just learned to walk at 3 weeks of age and run at 5 weeks of age, which was just a few short weeks ago. They are developing their gross motor skills that help them to run, play, and “hunt”.  Their fine motor skills will come later.  Puppies also learn to jump up at this stage. This is a normal behavior that can turn into an undesirable behavior when the puppy reaches adult-hood and jumps on every visitor. You can begin correcting your puppy and giving him positive reinforcement for good behavior.
  • Physical Appearance & Hair Coat– 8-week-old puppies have a baby type hair coat that is very fine and does very little shedding.  Get your puppy used to the brush and comb by gently using them on him for very short sessions that are kept positive.  Don’t hold your puppy down to be brushed or combed if he does not want to be.  Their muzzle is getting longer but overall they have the characteristics of a puppy.  The ears may begin to stand up in some breeds.
  • Sleep – Puppies that are 8 weeks old sleep approximately 18 to 22 hours per day.  The rest is spent eating, playing and eliminating.

The puppies will be ready to go home this week! We still have availability in this litter if you are interested in one of these puppies!

Well that’s it for this week! Here are some pictures of us!

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Puppy Playtime

We had a fun day today playing with the puppies!

Check it out!

Here is a video of playtime with Bentley-http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M4STPX2bKIA

And here is a video of Gimli-http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IFuatRLg2po

The puppies are 7 weeks old now! They are getting big and strong and becoming more adorable each day! Watching them grow up and develop their own personalities is wonderful!

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Puppy Update-7 Weeks Old!

Once puppies are born, the week to week development can vary but most newborns stick to the same growing pattern. Unlike human babies, puppies develop quickly within their first two months of life and the changes are so quick that you may miss an important milestone. From the first week to the eighth, you are going see your tiny bundles of joy go from wriggling whimpers to full-blown walking balls of energy.

Here’s our report from the Whelping Box:

We were born January 4, 2013 and we will be ready to go to our “forever homes” in mid March. There are 6 boys and 1 girl and we all love snuggling together in a big “puppy pile.” Our names are Gimli, Bentley, O’Reilly, Keegan, Doolan, Angus, and Iona. We’re all SEVEN WEEKS OLD now. You might think we haven’t been doing much for these first forty-nine days of our lives, but we’ve been quite busy. Just look!

Here it is, Day 49, and just look at what’s happened:

THIRD STAGE OF PUPPY DEVELOPMENT: 7 – 12 Weeks That little puppy has grown up pretty quickly and by 8 weeks old he’s ready to leave his canine family and go to his new home. Tiny breeds may mature more slowly and it’s better to keep these pups with their momma for up to 10 – 12 weeks.

He may be a little guy, but a puppy of this age is curious, outgoing and intelligent. He’s ready to find out all about the world around him and is eager to please his people.

Right now your puppy is the proverbial ‘blank slate’ and it’s easiest time to teach and train your puppy. He’s small enough to control, eager to learn and respects you as his ‘leader’. What he learns now will stay with him for life – good or bad – so make it good!

Socialization is also very important during this stage of puppy development… the more new sights, sounds, smells etc. that he can experience the better. Puppies who have lots of socialization experiences and stimulus during this period will be much better equipped to handle change as they grow.

Countless studies have shown that the best time for a pup to leave his momma and go to his new home is right around 8 weeks of age, so during this stage a puppy often moves to his ‘forever home’ and family.

Many new owners aren’t sure what to expect at first and there is often an adjustment period, you can learn more about the first few days/week with a new puppy on my Bringing Home A New Puppy page.

There is also the first ‘fear period’ to deal with. This usually comes on around 8 weeks of age and the pup may seem scared of his own shadow, wanting to stick close to you at all times.

His needs: He’s about to take off on a huge learning curve, so it’s the perfect time to start introducing your little guy to some basic manners and puppy training. Start basic obedience at home, and then move onto a formal obedience class once he’s fully vaccinated.

What you feed your puppy will have a long-term impact on his health and longevity. Feeding one of the best puppy food choices available is a big step towards keeping him happy and healthy, and growing at the proper rate.

It’s also vital to balance his need for socialization against health risks. Your puppy is very vulnerable to disease at this point in his life, so NEVER allow an unvaccinated puppy to interact with other pups or dogs who are not FULLY immunized.. also don’t give him access to any public areas such as parks, stores, sidewalks etc.

Any fearful reactions are pretty normal at this age, and are usually nothing to worry about. You don’t want to ‘coddle’ a pup who is behaving this way. Just maintain a positive attitude and use a happy, upbeat tone of voice so that he realizes there is nothing to be scared of.

Also, never push your pup to do something that he’s clearly terrified of – that will cause more problems than it will solve.

Check out some pictures of our adorable pups! We are accepting puppy applications now!

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Puppy Training at Seven Weeks

Housetraining

  • The first step in training any puppy, no matter his age, is to establish house rules by housetraining him. Both the Humane Society of the United States and the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals recommend taking a new puppy outside at least every two hours for at least the first few months after he’s been adopted. A puppy’s bladder is small and needs to be emptied much more frequently than an adult dog’s bladder. Because of this, puppies should be walked immediately after they wake up, eat or drink. Without having instant access to an outdoor toilet, they will certainly go potty indoors. Housetraining a puppy successfully can take weeks or months and usually depends on the dog’s personality and intelligence.

Showing Leadership

  • It’s common for dog trainers to tell owners that their dogs will never obey commands unless the dog being trained sees the person giving the command in a dominant position. When dominance training includes physical punishment or verbal abuse, especially with young puppies, the dogs being trained can quickly develop anxiety and phobias as a result. A more gentle way owners can establish leadership is by turning their backs and ignoring the puppy anytime he misbehaves, such as jumping on visitors, biting or barking. If the behavior continues, a trainer will usually put the puppy in a quiet room alone with a chew toy so he doesn’t get overly bored or destructive. After ten minutes, the dog is released. This method teaches puppies which behaviors are not allowed in their home.

Controlling Diet

  • Owners and trainers help teach pets who’s the boss by feeding puppies on a schedule. A key rule when training a puppy is to never leave a bowl of food down for the puppy to eat on all day. Instead, owners make sure they are at home every time their puppies are fed and that they immediately take the dogs for a walk afterward. When training a puppy, an owner should also hand feed him for several weeks. If the puppy acts aggressive or growls while eating, it is common practice to immediately take the food away, wait five minutes and try hand feeding the dog again. Feeding on a schedule or hand feeding a puppy teaches the puppy who controls his food.

Praise

  • It is important for owners of young puppies to show patience and remember that accidents do and will happen. Constantly scolding a puppy runs the risk of turning him into a timid and nervous pet, according to tips provided by the Humane Society of the United States. Dogs develop their behaviors based on what is expected of them, and praising a puppy helps teach him what behavior is expected. Whenever a puppy does something a trainer wants, the trainer will pet him, call him a good boy and give him a tasty treat or playtime with a favorite toy.

Socialization

  • Owners can socialize a puppy by taking him to a dog park or arranging a play date with a friend’s dog soon after adoption. This is critical to his behavioral development. Properly socializing a 7-week-old puppy helps him learn social hierarchy and understand who his master is. It can also help prevent puppies from growing into nervous and anxious canines.

     

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Puppy Update-6 Weeks Old!

Once puppies are born, the week to week development can vary but most newborns stick to the same growing pattern. Unlike human babies, puppies develop quickly within their first two months of life and the changes are so quick that you may miss an important milestone. From the first week to the eighth, you are going see your tiny bundles of joy go from wriggling whimpers to full-blown walking balls of energy.

Here’s our report from the Whelping Box:

We were born January 4, 2013 and we will be ready to go to our “forever homes” in mid March. There are 6 boys and 1 girl and we all love snuggling together in a big “puppy pile.” Our names are Angus, Gimli, Keegan, Bentley, Iona, O’Reilly and Doolan. We’re all SIX WEEKS OLD now. You might think we haven’t been doing much for these first thirty-five days of our lives, but we’ve been quite busy. Just look!

Here it is, Day 42, and just look at what’s happened:

During the sixth week, the puppies will be getting regular supplemental feedings. Small dry kibble is being introduced to wean from an all-wet diet. This is the preparation stage for full weaning of the pups from their mother by the end of the fifth week. We are taking the time to interact with the puppies individually so that the young pups begin their socialization training with humans and not just with their littermates.

Puppy Development: Stage 3

Week 4 to week 12 typically comprise the third stage of puppy development. During this stage, the senses begin to mature and socialization becomes an important part of the puppy’s life. The puppies are interacting with other dogs and with people during this key phase.

For the first few weeks of this phase, it’s likely that the only other dogs the puppies will have access to are his mother and littermates. The puppies’ normal body temperature is approximately 100 degrees Fahrenheit, and their systems will begin regulating that temperature naturally. Additionally, the instinct to squat will take over and external stimulation will no longer be required for the puppies to move their bowels.

Early socialization will manifest as a basic kind of play with the puppy’s littermates – wrestling and a reserved play-biting known as “inhibited bite.” This is the way in which the puppy will begin to learn about social structure and pack ranking. Rules, boundaries, and limitations set by his mother begin to take shape. Physical co-ordination and eyesight are still not fully developed, but the puppy’s mobility will have progressed beyond wiggling, rolling, and flopping around.

Weeks 5 through 7 are the time for the puppies to begin their socialization with people. Their sense of hearing is well-developed enough to allow command conditioning using positive reinforcement, as well as name recognition. The puppies are responding when they are being called; which makes it so much easier to keep them all in line.

Well that is all for this week! Stay tuned for next week’s report and check out the pictures below!

We are accepting puppy deposits on puppies now!

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Update from the Whelping Box-Week 5!

Once puppies are born, the week to week development can vary but most newborns stick to the same growing pattern. Unlike human babies, puppies develop quickly within their first two months of life and the changes are so quick that you may miss an important milestone. From the first week to the eighth, you are going see your tiny bundles of joy go from wriggling whimpers to full-blown walking balls of energy.

Here’s our report from the Whelping Box:

We were born January 4, 2013 and we will be ready to go to our “forever homes” in mid March. There are 6 boys and 1 girl and we all love snuggling together in a big “puppy pile.” Our names are Angus, Gimli, Keegan, Bentley, Iona, O’Reilly and Doolan. We’re all FIVE WEEKS OLD now. You might think we haven’t been doing much for these first thirty-five days of our lives, but we’ve been quite busy. Just look!

Here it is, Day 35, and just look at what’s happened:

During the fifth week, the puppies will be getting regular supplemental feedings. Small dry kibble is being introduced to wean from an all-wet diet. This is the preparation stage for full weaning of the pups from their mother by the end of the fifth week. We are taking the time to interact with the puppies individually so that the young pups begin their socialization training with humans and not just with their littermates.

Puppy Development: Stage 3

Week 4 to week 12 typically comprise the third stage of puppy development. During this stage, the senses begin to mature and socialization becomes an important part of the puppy’s life. The puppies are interacting with other dogs and with people during this key phase.

For the first few weeks of this phase, it’s likely that the only other dogs the puppies will have access to are his mother and littermates. The puppies’ normal body temperature is approximately 100 degrees Fahrenheit, and their systems will begin regulating that temperature naturally. Additionally, the instinct to squat will take over and external stimulation will no longer be required for the puppies to move their bowels.

Early socialization will manifest as a basic kind of play with the puppy’s littermates – wrestling and a reserved play-biting known as “inhibited bite.” This is the way in which the puppy will begin to learn about social structure and pack ranking. Rules, boundaries, and limitations set by his mother begin to take shape. Physical co-ordination and eyesight are still not fully developed, but the puppy’s mobility will have progressed beyond wiggling, rolling, and flopping around.

Weeks 5 through 7 are the time for the puppies to begin their socialization with people. Their sense of hearing is well-developed enough to allow command conditioning using positive reinforcement, as well as name recognition. The puppies are responding when they are being called; which makes it so much easier to keep them all in line.

Well that is all for this week! Stay tuned for next week’s report and check out the pictures below!

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Puppy Update-4 Weeks Old!

This litter was born on January 4, 2013! There are adorable, chocolate, fleece-coated, medium-sized Australian Labradoodles. There are 7 puppies in this litter-6 boys and 1 girl. They are all FOUR WEEKS OLD NOW!

The little ones are fine and thriving, and they are turning into real puppies now! They’re up on their feet, wagging their tales, seeing, hearing, playing with toys, romping, and chewing on each other (and biting each other’s ears, which hurts with those sharp puppy teeth).  They’re getting much more 1:1 time with us, apart from each other, and we’re beginning gentle redirection on things like puppy biting and jumping to which they are responding quite well (they are *so* eager to please!).

They’re still nursing, but we’ll slowly introduce them to solid food toward the end of this week with the goal of transitioning them completely by the time they’re six weeks old. They should be weaned by their six-week-old vet visit for check-ups and vaccines.

Just two days ago, on a sunny 65-degree day, we carried each outside to experience the feel of the sun and breeze and the sounds of planes overhead, wind chimes, and bird calls.  All were appropriately timid at first but seemed to relax and enjoy the adventure. They now love to romp around in the grass and follow us around.

Socialization: Four to Six Weeks

From four to six weeks, puppies continue to be influenced by their mother and littermates. They learn to play, gaining needed social skills from littermates, such as inhibited biting (biting to play, not to hurt). The puppies also learn the ins and outs of group structure and ranking within the group.  The puppies are being socialized with humans, have a variety of people interacting with them – young (with supervision) and old, male and female. House-training can begin as early as five weeks, when puppies will follow their mother through a dog door or can be taken out for elimination lessons. At approximately six weeks, puppies can begin in-home training.  His first collar and lead will be introduced, he will be encouraged to come using his name, and reward him with praise and treats. At this age, you can also start training puppies with positive reinforcement methods: using a clicker, praise, and rewards.

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Update from the Whelping Box-Week 3

Though I know well that the third week of a pup’s life is marked by huge milestones. It’s like they turn into puppies (as most people think of puppies) overnight.

This litter was born on January 4, 2013! There are adorable, chocolate, fleece-coated, medium-sized Australian Labradoodles. There are 7 puppies in this litter-6 boys and 1 girl. They are all THREE WEEKS OLD NOW!

Here it is, Day 21 or Week 3, and just look at what’s happened:

  • Walking has become the preferred method of ambulation (instead of crawling).  Granted, it’s still a drunken-sailor walk, but they’re up on all fours!
  • Elimination and voiding is now something they do on their own. Fiona is cleaning less; the humans are cleaning more. :)
  • The pups get up from where they’re sleeping and waddle over to a different part of the whelping box to potty, then waddle back to the puppy pile. They’re instinctively pottying in places other than where they sleep.
  • Their vision is becoming usable. When they “see” things now, they react appropriately with sniffs or puzzlement or growls or barks or pounces.
  • They recognize each other (oh boy, litter mates!).
  • They play with each other. Okay, so it doesn’t last very long, but they do “play” for short stretches.
  • They wrassle. :O)
  • They’re feeling secure with their humans, not just with Fiona.
  • They can pant and lap.
  • They have started to grow in (ouch! for Fiona) teeth!  Their baby teeth are just poking through their gums, and just like human babies, this is uncomfortable for them.  They’re beginning to feel the need to chew (look out world!)
  • They can voluntarily sit, stand, roll over, scratch, paw, wag their tails, chew, investigate objects they “see” (still blurry, but visible), and are just beginning to climb.
  • This morning, I noticed that the puppies might be responding to sound, so I suspect their ears may be starting to unseal.
  • We will be giving the puppies their litter names this weeks also!

We are accepting deposits for this litter now!

Here are some pictures of the adorable puppies!

 

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